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  • 2016 UCR Enforcement Delayed

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    TruckingThe Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) issued a bulletin last week announcing the Unified Carrier Registration Agreement (UCR) has been delayed until Feb. 1, 2016.

    The original bulletin called for enforcement to begin Jan. 1, however due to reported computer glitches in the transition to a fully on-line system the delay was needed.

    All motor carriers subject to the UCR were notified reminders or UCR application forms on how to register and pay 2016 UCR fees online at www.ucr.in.gov. The Federal Motor Carrier Administration (FMCSA) added a 49 C.F.R violation code to indicate when a carrier is not in compliance.

    41 states are participating in UCR. States not included are Arizona, Florida, Hawaii, Oregon, Maryland, Nevada, New Jersey, Vermont and Wyoming.

    The UCR Board of Directors say, enforcement should only occur after on-line or telephonic verification that the company has failed to register for the 2016 UCR registration year. Roadside enforcement should only be performed for the 2016 UCR registration year unless proof of operation in a previous registration year can be obtained.

      The fee structure is as follows:
    • $76 for0 to 2 Vehicles;
    • $227 for 3 to 5 Vehicles;
    • $452 for 6 to 20 Vehicles;
    • $1,576 for 21 to 100 Vehicles;
    • $7,511 for 101 to 1000 Vehicles;
    • $73,346 for 1001 or more Vehicles

    To verify UCR compliance, visit www.safersys.org, under FMCSA, click on Unified Carrier Registration.

  • Health = Wealth, a little goes a long way

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    Whether you realize it or not, the condition of your health, both physically and mentally, directly relates to your wealth. How you may ask? There isn’t one simple answer, but rather there is a web of connections between the two, especially when it comes to the workplace. Healthy workers are not only happier, but also have increased productivity and reduced absenteeism, workers’ compensation and disability claims. When you are healthier, you spend less money on supplements, medicine and doctors’ visits and more time on activities that rejuvenate and encourage you. This boils over into your attitude at work, and motivation to do well and aspire to grow and keeps your hard-earned dollars in your wallet!

    As a truck driver, it can be challenging to find exercise time everyday due to the sedentary nature of the job, but it is not impossible. Only 14% of the 3 million truck drivers in the United States are not overweight or obese. Of these 3 million truck drivers, only 8% exercise regularly compared to 49% of the general population. TravelCenters of America is trying to improve this number, and help truck drivers kick off a healthy 2016 by offering a selection of fitness, food and wellness options from its StayFit Program. Drivers would have access to things like healthy grab ‘n go snacks and StayFit exercise options at participating TA and Petro stations. Exercise options include, fitness rooms, walking and running trailers, basketball hoops and outdoor fitness areas at many locations.

    One thing to remember as a driver is, you are not alone! 83% of jobs in the U.S. are sedentary in nature. Approximately 50% of the U.S. population is not regularly physically active, and 25% are not active at all. Here are some creative ways for people to stay active while working their sedentary job:

    1. Walk. Take advantage of your lunch break. No matter how long you have for lunch, devote half of your time to go for a walk and the other half to eating.
    2. Make it easy. Create your own mini fitness center in your truck. TravelCenters of America is offering items like, push-up bars, resistance bands, hand grips, and workout gloves at driver stores. Other items you could keep with you are dumbbells or a jump rope. 10 minutes of exercise can make a big impact if done regularly.
    3. Utilize down time. When dropping off a load, the last thing you want to do is have to wait, but it happens. Take advantage of this and turn it into a positive part of your day by working out. Use the light equipment in your truck, go for a walk or jump rope while waiting.
  • Top 2015 Stories Out of Washington

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    Capital BuildingIn 2015, the trucking community and government came together, through lobbying and debating, to address several topics affecting the trucking industry, furthering many major initiatives. These are the top five.

    1. Beyond Compliance: The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) requested public comment on the proposed Beyond Compliance program. The initiative proposes an incentive-based approach that offers “voluntary programs implemented by motor carriers that exceed regulatory requirements” in hopes to improve safety by reducing the number and severity of crashes.
    2. Electronic Stability: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) issued the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 136, which mandates the use of electronic stability control systems on Class 7-8 trucks and large buses. The rule will take effect in 2017, however, many fleets have already voluntarily begun the switch.
    3. Phase 2 GHG/MPG: The proposed fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions rules target 2021-2027 model year trucks and tractors and 2018-2027 MY trailers. The new rule differs from Phase 1 in a few ways. For example, it would regulate trailers, set GHG limits for complete vehicles including trailers and would set separate engine fuel efficiency standards for light, medium and heavy duty vehicles.
    4. Electronic Logging: The FMCSA released the final rule mandating the use of electronic logging devices (ELD). Truck and bus drivers have two years to make the switch. David Heller, TCA Director of Safety and Policy says the rule is to, “alleviate some of the burdens regarding supporting documents, eases compliance with the Hours-of-Service Regulations and furthers the efforts of the agency in the fight against driver coercion and harassment.”
    5. Highway Bill: The long awaited highway bill was passed just before the New Year. TheFixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act is a fully funded five year bill totaling $305 billion in highway and trucking projects.

    2015 brought in some great new rules and reforms in the trucking industry setting up 2016 to be a winning year.

  • States Consider New Mandate Allowing Police to Pull Over Truckers for too Much Snow

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    snowy trucks Each year when winter rolls around, truck drivers are encouraged to clear snow and ice off of their trucks. The topic of mandating snow and ice removal is not a new one in most states. Already, states like Alabama, Connecticut, Georgia, Iowa, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Wisconsin have laws addressing large accumulations of snow and ice on top of vehicles, allowing police officers to ticket if the accumulation is large and poses a threat to safety.

    Many point out that the falling piles of snow and ice from trucks causes a lot of damage and hazard to other motorists. However despite the hazard, OOIDA and numerous truck drivers are opposed to a rule allowing police officers to pull over and ticket a truck driver for this reason because it would be nearly impossible for drivers to comply with. There isn’t always a safe way for a driver to even know how much snow and ice has accumulated nor how to clear the top of his truck which can be over 14-feet in the air in wet slippery conditions. What does your company recommend regarding snow/ice removal?

    Check out the current state laws in place.

  • ELD Mandate Garners Praise from Some and a Law Suit from others

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016
    Photo Source: Aaron Marsh/Fleet Owner

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) published the long anticipated rule requiring the use of electronic log devices (ELD) on December 16, 2015.

    Four things to know about the new rule:

    • Truck and bus drivers using paper logs must switch to ELD within two years. Approximately 3 million drivers will be affected. Drivers of vehicles made before 2000 will not be required to use ELDs.
    • The rule includes procedural and technical provisions to protect truck and bus drivers from harassment over the information on their ELD.
    • The rule sets specific technology performance and design requirements for ELDs.
    • The rule establishes new hours-of-service supporting documents requirements.

    Check out the three phased plan to implement the new rule.

    The announcement comes with both praise and criticism. The Owner Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) is suing the FMCSA over the recent announcement of the ELD mandate. OOIDA is calling for a judicial review of the ELD Mandate on the grounds that it, “mandates that truck drivers use ELDs to track their record of duty status and compliance with HOS regulations even though such devices can only track movement of a vehicle and approximate location.”

    OOIDA feels that the rule does not benefit the drivers, but rather is an intrusion of their rights and places, “even more pressure and stress on drivers than they already deal with.”

    Despite the OOIDA’s opposition, the rule has also received positive backing. Technology providers feel that this new mandate provides an opportunity for carriers to gain critical data that will help cut costs. Ravi Kodavarti, director of product management for mobile communications at Rand McNally, told Fleet Owner, “we’re in a situation now where fleets that haven’t adopted such technology can take advantage of all the improvements we’ve made over the last five years,” he stressed. “These are improvements that have made ELDs less expensive, easier to install, and more intuitive to operate.”

    Other supporters applaud the rule for its effort to reduce the amount of supporting documents are required of drivers and attempting to streamline the system.

    There is still much uncertainty among the industry as the rule is being phased in but many are hopeful.

  • CSA Data Removed from Public View

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    shutterstock_1250741As of December 4, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has removed most of the information regarding property carrier’s compliance and safety performance from the FMCSA website. This decision came when Congress passed the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act. The new highway bill calls for a thorough review and reform to the CSA’s current enforcement prioritization program. Until the changes are made, the data will remain from public view.

    According to the reviews of the GAO, the Department of Transportation Inspector General, and other law enforcement organizations, the FAST Act requires the FMCSA to remove the data while the analysis and reforms are being made. “Enforcement and inspection data reported by states and enforcement agencies will remain available for public view.” Enforcement users and motor carriers can still view safety data using their login information.

  • Changes to Trucker Medical Certifications Begin this December

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    medical-certification.tmb-mediumChanges to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s medical examination regulations will take effect on December 22, 2015. Starting on the 22nd, drivers will have a new Medical Examination Report Form to complete for their DOT physical. The new form includes several more questions about the driver’s medical history.

    The rule will require medical personnel to electronically submit the results on the National Registry once a month. Drivers will be required to carry their exam certificate for 15 days after the physical. This is to ensure the driver has proof of medical certification while the exam results may still be loading into the database. After the 15 days, law enforcement will have access to the records in the database and the driver will not need to carry a copy.

    After June 22, 2018 medical examiners will be required to submit the test results by the end of the day, and drivers will not have to carry medical certification at all.

  • Wreaths Across America – Honoring Our Fallen Heroes

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    wreaths-across-americabe41aa4ec32e66bb83efff000018e376Wreaths across America came from the humble beginnings of a wreath farmer. Morrill Worcester,the owner of Worcester Wreath Company in Harrington, Maine, has always had a heart for those who serve our country. As a young boy his visit to Arlington National Cemetery made a lasting impression he’d carry with him for the rest of his life. In 1992, the Worcester Wreath Company had a surplus of Christmas wreaths nearing the end of the holiday season. Without hesitation, Morrill knew how to use the extra wreaths for something great. Thus began the quest to lay a wreath on the tombstones of our fallen heroes in Arlington.

    Over the years the selfless act has gained an enormous amount of support, and has grown to become a national event. This year, Saturday December 12, 2015 will be National Wreaths across America Day. The massive logistical coordination of laying wreaths in Arlington and other veterans’ cemeteries across the country is made possible with the help of volunteers, donors and truck drivers. To move the amount of wreaths needed for this event, truck drivers across the country step up to the plate, helping deliver over 24,000 wreaths to 825 different locations. You can visit the Wreaths across America website and join organizations, such as, Women in Trucking, honor our heroes. There are many ways to get involved.

    Their mission statement, “Remember, Honor, Teach,” is simple, but powerful. Wreaths across America created a few videos to explain why they do what they do.

    Morrill said, “I wanted to give back and it’s because of the freedom that we all have is why I can do what I do and what everybody else can do what they do. I just wanted to give back. Nobody should let anybody that was killed over there, their name be forgotten or forget what they did.”

    Commentary from the video sums up the mission statement and the meaning behind it, “We gather here today to place over 24,000 holiday wreaths to remember the fallen, honor those who served, and to teach our children the value of freedom. In life, they honored their country, in death their country honors them.

  • Happy Thanksgiving! What are You Thankful for?

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    Centerline would like to wish you and your family a wonderful and happy Thanksgiving! We are so thankful for our drivers, the hard work they put forward every day, and the family and friends who support them.

    Centerline would like to wish you and your family a wonderful and happy Thanksgiving! We are so thankful for our drivers, the hard work they put forward every day, and the family and friends who support them.

    Centerline would like to wish you and your family a wonderful and happy Thanksgiving! We are so thankful for our drivers, the hard work they put forward every day, and the family and friends who support them.

    Centerline would like to wish you and your family a wonderful and happy Thanksgiving! We are so thankful for our drivers, the hard work they put forward every day, and the family and friends who support them.

    Centerline would like to wish you and your family a wonderful and happy Thanksgiving! We are so thankful for our drivers, the hard work they put forward every day, and the family and friends who support them.

  • Special Delivery for Turkey Day!

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    For the transportation industry, the holiday season is a busy one. Between food and presents, our wheels never stop rolling to get all cargo to its destination. Have you ever considered how much of an impact something like delivering turkeys to market has on the economy? In 2014, the turkey industry made up 308,400 jobs and generated $80.1 billion in economic activity. $16.9 billion in wages and $5.6 billion in government revenue! The trucking industry plays a big role in making Thanksgiving Day happen. Here a few things that would not happen without the help of truck drivers.

    1. When you think of Thanksgiving, you think of turkey. Roughly 88% of Americans eat turkey on Thanksgiving. So it’s pretty important those turkeys get to the table on time and truck drivers come to the rescue. In 2012, trucks delivered 46 million Thanksgiving Turkeys. That’s a lot of turkey! Not to mention all the sides to go with it.

      Thanksgiving Turkeys

    2. It is the tradition of many families to either attend or watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. The first Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade took place in NYC in 1924 and over the years has grown to 3 million in attendance and more than 44 million watch on TV. In order to breathe life into the famous parade balloons, each one is filled with an average of 12,000 cubic feet of helium and can take about 90 minutes to inflate! This requires the help of a professional truck driver driving a helium tanker. Without a truck driver to bring in the tanker, the balloons would not go up and it would make for a pretty boring parade.

    3. Thanksgiving is now a retail buzzword because of the infamous “holiday” to follow it, Black Friday. Whether you are a shopper on a mission or casually browsing, the trucking industry is responsible for delivering products to the stores so the shelves are stocked and ready for the rush. Once Black Friday is taken care of, we rely on trucks to deliver the goods purchased on Cyber Monday. Without our drivers America’s favorite shopping weekend would fall short.

    4. Finally, we can’t forget about travel. According to AAA forecast, about 46.3 million Americans traveled on Thanksgiving Day weekend in 2014, 89% by automobile. Keeping the nation’s gas stations supplied for all of these travelers requires a truck driver to drive the fuel tanker to the gas stations.

    Food, parades, shopping and travel are a few things that make up Thanksgiving Day weekend but they are not the true meaning. When you cut through the clutter and push past the holiday rush you get to its heart, a day of giving thanks for the blessing of the harvest of the preceding year. Traditionally, this referred to the agricultural harvest, however over the years it has grown into much more. It is a time to reflect and be thankful for your life’s harvest. The growing love of family, new friends added to your life, accomplishments you’ve made, and lessons learned. Although not the heart of the day, the different things listed above all play a role in bringing people together to remember the important things in life and make memories, and without truck drivers they wouldn’t happen. So as we enter the holiday season we’d like to extend our appreciation and thanks to truck drivers. Happy Thanksgiving.

  • Walmart Driver Receives National Driver of the Year Award for Outstanding Safety Record

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    james-hylan-grise-photo-source-ataJames Hylan Grise is the recipient of the National Driver of the Year Award, presented by American Trucking Associations. Grise has been driving for more than 42 years and currently drives for Walmart Transportation in Hopkinsville, KY. He has been chosen for this award because of his outstanding commitment to delivering loads in the safest and most efficient way possible.

    American Trucking Associations President and CEO Bill Graves, commended Grise on his safety record, “Hylan has had an exceptional career as a professional truck driver with zero accidents during his 42 year career. That’s truly a remarkable accomplishment.”

    Throughout his career, Grise has been actively involved in several of the Walmart sponsored driving safety courses on distracted driving, defensive driving, injury prevention, and recognizing drug and alcohol abuse. He also participates in the Walmart Heart Program to help children and adults with chronic medical conditions or special needs. His dedication to safety and love of the industry is manifested through his 4.25 million accident free miles, 11 Kentucky Driver Championships, and qualifying 4 times for the National Truck Driving Championships.

    Bill Graves said it best when he stated, “the trucking industry relies on drivers like James Hylan to drive each day with a safety-first mindset and his commitment to safety and professionalism deserves praise.”

  • Are You Ready for Better Roads?

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    Just in the nick of time, as the current highway-bill was about to expire, the Senate passed an extension. The Surface Transportation Extension Act of 2015 will extend its funding of the federal highway and transit programs through November 20, 2015. Although the extension is a mere 22 days, Congress is determined and confident they will pass a long-term highway bill before the deadline.

    The House of Transportation and Infrastructure Committee proposed the Surface Transportation Reauthorization and Reform (STRR) Act of 2015 on October 22, and it is slated to be reviewed this week by the House. The STRR Act would authorize a budget of $325 billion for transportation projects over the next six years, $261 billion will be dedicated to highways. The bill includes the long-term Senate measure, but would require Congress to pass a separate legislation to approve additional funding after the first three years. The House Ways and Means Committee is charged with the responsibility to come up with the funding.

    Once passed by the House, the two chambers will hold a conference to work out differences and final details. The bill will then be sent to President Obama to sign. It is the hope, and goal, to have this bill through by the new deadline of November 20th. It is time to start fixing our highways and infrastructure.

  • Think Gas is Expensive in Your Neck of the Woods? Think Again.

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    When it comes to using gasoline, Americans have no competition. Americans burn about 1.2 gallons of gasoline per person per day. Far more than any other county. The cost per gallon in the United States falls within the range of less than $1.83 in some areas in Texas to greater than $2.84 in some areas of California. Not too bad if you compare it to the prices we saw back in 2008 at an average of $4.45!

    US gas prices

    $4.45 per gallon may seem astronomical, however have you ever wonder how our gas prices compare to the rest of the world? Believe it or not, the United States is below the average. Imagine gas prices at $7.71 per gallon – the price of gas in Norway. On the flip side, imagine gas prices at $0.45 per gallon, or even better yet $0.00 – the price for gas is FREE in Venezuela. In the United States, the trucking industry accounts for 13% of the country’s total fuel consumption, that’s over 50 billion gallons of fuel every year. If we were in Norway that would cost $385.5 billion! If we were in Venezuela it would cost nothing. Bloomberg Business created an interactive chart to show where countries ranked when it came to gas prices. Check it out.

  • You Are in Good Company! 9 Celebrities that Used to Be Truck Drivers

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    As a truck driver you sit among the celebrities. Below are nine celebrities who can put truck driving down on their resume.


      Elvis Presley
    1. Elvis Presley - Before becoming the King of Rock and Roll, Elvis was known to have spent some time behind the wheel, he made $1 an hour driving for the Crown Electric Company.

    2. Sean Connery
    3. Sean Connery- Before “James Bond” was driving the 2000 GT or Mustang Mach 1, he got practice as a truck driver. For Connery, trucking was a family business his father Joe was also a truck driver.

    4. Liam Neeson
    5. Liam Neeson - This famous tough guy actor really was a tough guy. Before his career in acting, Neeson worked as a truck and forklift driver for Guinness.

    6. James Cameron
    7. James Cameron - Cameron was not always known for his record breaking films like Avatar, Titanic, The Terminator and more. Before the fame, Cameron was a truck driver and on his breaks he’d work on his screenplays.

    8. Richard Pryor
    9. Richard Pryor - Always a funny guy, but not always professionally, Pryor had several jobs before making it as a comedian, including as a truck driver.

    10. Chevy Chase
    11. Chevy Chase - The lovable National Lampoon actor and SNL star first worked as a truck driver before breaking into the acting world.

    12. Charles Bronson
    13. Charles Bronson - Before starring in movies like “The Great Escape” and “The Dirty Dozen,” Bronson was drafted into the army and started as a truck driver before training as a pilot.

    14. Viggo Mortensen
    15. Viggo Mortensen - He is known for his famous role in Lord of the Rings as Aragorn, but before becoming that famous legend, Mortensen earned a living as a truck driver in Demark.

    16. Chris Tarrent
    17. Chris Tarrant - You may know him as ITV’s host of “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?” but before giving away millions, Tarrant worked as a security officer, schoolteacher and long-distance truck driver.

    Who knows what celebrities of the future are behind the wheel today!

  • Reaching the Next Generation One Driver at a Time

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    The Women in Trucking Accelerate! Conference & Expo took place last week over the course of two and ½ days. It was a great first step to engage with industry leaders from transportation, logistics and supply chain to learn and address the issues and trends affecting all drivers and women in particular. As the current driver shortage tops 35,000 and is projected 240,000 drivers will be needed by 2023, we explored taking an untraditional approach to driver recruitment and retention.

    Throughout the event it was evident that communication is one of the critical keys to successfully generating a new pipeline of qualified drivers. Building the talent pipeline is priority number one. Several key members shared their thoughts on how to best accomplish this and the following avenues were agreed upon.

    • Meet the needs of women and millennial drivers
    • Promote trucking as a career early in high school
    • Communicate the opportunity to see the country and be independent

    We know through our work with recruiting high demand trades that the best success is to build programs that educate our youth early on alternative options to the traditional route of high school then college. Vocational programs are a viable option for many students. Getting parents to consider these options is also part of the critical communication that needs to take place. Entering a career in transportation is a gateway into the largest sector of our economy in the United States. It’s an opportunity to be a part of something that is critically important.

     

    “It is rewarding every day, to know you are moving America, because America would stop without truck drivers.”

                        -Charlotte

     

    “Trucking gives you the ability to be independent.”

                        -Patricia

     

    “Trucking makes me feel confident, especially when I get a thumbs up from other women.”

                        -Ruby

     

    Accelerate Conference & Expo. reinforced the importance of how women leaders in the transportation industry must take the opportunity to mentor and promote healthy relationships and an empowering organizational culture.

     

    “I would love to tell women how exciting and advantageous this career has been.”

                        -Anonymous

     

    Centerline is thankful to have the opportunity to be a part of this great event and is dedicated to promoting and encouraging women drivers. Join our team today.


    Accelerate! Conference & Expo.

    The Women in Trucking Accelerate! Conference & Expo took place last week over the course of two and ½ days. It was a great first step to engage with industry leaders from transportation, logistics and supply chain to learn and address the issues and trends affecting all drivers and women in particular. As the current driver shortage tops 35,000 and is projected 240,000 drivers will be needed by 2023, we explored taking an untraditional approach to driver recruitment and retention.

    Throughout the event it was evident that communication is one of the critical keys to successfully generating a new pipeline of qualified drivers. Building the talent pipeline is priority number one. Several key members shared their thoughts on how to best accomplish this and the following avenues were agreed upon.

    • Meet the needs of women and millennial drivers
    • Promote trucking as a career early in high school
    • Communicate the opportunity to see the country and be independent

    We know through our work with recruiting high demand trades that the best success is to build programs that educate our youth early on alternative options to the traditional route of high school then college. Vocational programs are a viable option for many students. Getting parents to consider these options is also part of the critical communication that needs to take place. Entering a career in transportation is a gateway into the largest sector of our economy in the United States. It’s an opportunity to be a part of something that is critically important.

     

    “It is rewarding every day, to know you are moving America, because America would stop without truck drivers.”

                        -Charlotte

     

    “Trucking gives you the ability to be independent.”

                        -Patricia

     

    “Trucking makes me feel confident, especially when I get a thumbs up from other women.”

                        -Ruby

     

    Accelerate Conference & Expo. reinforced the importance of how women leaders in the transportation industry must take the opportunity to mentor and promote healthy relationships and an empowering organizational culture.

     

    “I would love to tell women how exciting and advantageous this career has been.”

                        -Anonymous

     

    Centerline is thankful to have the opportunity to be a part of this great event and is dedicated to promoting and encouraging women drivers. Join our team today.

    Accelerate! Conference & Expo.

    The Women in Trucking Accelerate! Conference & Expo took place last week over the course of two and ½ days. It was a great first step to engage with industry leaders from transportation, logistics and supply chain to learn and address the issues and trends affecting all drivers and women in particular. As the current driver shortage tops 35,000 and is projected 240,000 drivers will be needed by 2023, we explored taking an untraditional approach to driver recruitment and retention.

    Throughout the event it was evident that communication is one of the critical keys to successfully generating a new pipeline of qualified drivers. Building the talent pipeline is priority number one. Several key members shared their thoughts on how to best accomplish this and the following avenues were agreed upon.

    • Meet the needs of women and millennial drivers
    • Promote trucking as a career early in high school
    • Communicate the opportunity to see the country and be independent

    We know through our work with recruiting high demand trades that the best success is to build programs that educate our youth early on alternative options to the traditional route of high school then college. Vocational programs are a viable option for many students. Getting parents to consider these options is also part of the critical communication that needs to take place. Entering a career in transportation is a gateway into the largest sector of our economy in the United States. It’s an opportunity to be a part of something that is critically important.

     

    “It is rewarding every day, to know you are moving America, because America would stop without truck drivers.”

                        -Charlotte

     

    “Trucking gives you the ability to be independent.”

                        -Patricia

     

    “Trucking makes me feel confident, especially when I get a thumbs up from other women.”

                        -Ruby

     

    Accelerate Conference & Expo. reinforced the importance of how women leaders in the transportation industry must take the opportunity to mentor and promote healthy relationships and an empowering organizational culture.

     

    “I would love to tell women how exciting and advantageous this career has been.”

                        -Anonymous

     

    Centerline is thankful to have the opportunity to be a part of this great event and is dedicated to promoting and encouraging women drivers. Join our team today.

    Accelerate! Conference & Expo.

    The Women in Trucking Accelerate! Conference & Expo took place last week over the course of two and ½ days. It was a great first step to engage with industry leaders from transportation, logistics and supply chain to learn and address the issues and trends affecting all drivers and women in particular. As the current driver shortage tops 35,000 and is projected 240,000 drivers will be needed by 2023, we explored taking an untraditional approach to driver recruitment and retention.

    Throughout the event it was evident that communication is one of the critical keys to successfully generating a new pipeline of qualified drivers. Building the talent pipeline is priority number one. Several key members shared their thoughts on how to best accomplish this and the following avenues were agreed upon.

    • Meet the needs of women and millennial drivers
    • Promote trucking as a career early in high school
    • Communicate the opportunity to see the country and be independent

    We know through our work with recruiting high demand trades that the best success is to build programs that educate our youth early on alternative options to the traditional route of high school then college. Vocational programs are a viable option for many students. Getting parents to consider these options is also part of the critical communication that needs to take place. Entering a career in transportation is a gateway into the largest sector of our economy in the United States. It’s an opportunity to be a part of something that is critically important.

     

    “It is rewarding every day, to know you are moving America, because America would stop without truck drivers.”

                        -Charlotte

     

    “Trucking gives you the ability to be independent.”

                        -Patricia

     

    “Trucking makes me feel confident, especially when I get a thumbs up from other women.”

                        -Ruby

     

    Accelerate Conference & Expo. reinforced the importance of how women leaders in the transportation industry must take the opportunity to mentor and promote healthy relationships and an empowering organizational culture.

     

    “I would love to tell women how exciting and advantageous this career has been.”

                        -Anonymous

     

    Centerline is thankful to have the opportunity to be a part of this great event and is dedicated to promoting and encouraging women drivers. Join our team today.

    Accelerate! Conference & Expo.

    The Women in Trucking Accelerate! Conference & Expo took place last week over the course of two and ½ days. It was a great first step to engage with industry leaders from transportation, logistics and supply chain to learn and address the issues and trends affecting all drivers and women in particular. As the current driver shortage tops 35,000 and is projected 240,000 drivers will be needed by 2023, we explored taking an untraditional approach to driver recruitment and retention.

    Throughout the event it was evident that communication is one of the critical keys to successfully generating a new pipeline of qualified drivers. Building the talent pipeline is priority number one. Several key members shared their thoughts on how to best accomplish this and the following avenues were agreed upon.

    • Meet the needs of women and millennial drivers
    • Promote trucking as a career early in high school
    • Communicate the opportunity to see the country and be independent

    We know through our work with recruiting high demand trades that the best success is to build programs that educate our youth early on alternative options to the traditional route of high school then college. Vocational programs are a viable option for many students. Getting parents to consider these options is also part of the critical communication that needs to take place. Entering a career in transportation is a gateway into the largest sector of our economy in the United States. It’s an opportunity to be a part of something that is critically important.

     

    “It is rewarding every day, to know you are moving America, because America would stop without truck drivers.”

                        -Charlotte

     

    “Trucking gives you the ability to be independent.”

                        -Patricia

     

    “Trucking makes me feel confident, especially when I get a thumbs up from other women.”

                        -Ruby

     

    Accelerate Conference & Expo. reinforced the importance of how women leaders in the transportation industry must take the opportunity to mentor and promote healthy relationships and an empowering organizational culture.

     

    “I would love to tell women how exciting and advantageous this career has been.”

                        -Anonymous

     

    Centerline is thankful to have the opportunity to be a part of this great event and is dedicated to promoting and encouraging women drivers. Join our team today.

    Accelerate! Conference & Expo.

  • How to Navigate the Crazy World of Technology - Part 1

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    Life is busy but staying in touch with your loved ones has never been easier. When you’re out and about on the go and won’t be able to get home that night, or you live apart from loved ones, there is still a way to see that adorable face of your grandchild, child or loved one. Technology has changed the way the world connects. There are now numerous ways to stay in touch from Skype and FaceTime to texting and social media.

    Smart phone purchases continue to rise. As of April, 2015 64% of Americans own a smartphone. With that one purchase you now have the world in your hand. Below is a list of a few options to help you stay in touch with your family beyond the normal phone call when you can’t make it home that night.

    FaceTime – probably the easiest to use but only available if you have an iPhone. Simple click the FaceTime app. FaceTime  and type in the name, number or email of your family member or friend. The great thing about FaceTime is you can run it on your data so you don’t necessarily have to be in a location with Wi-Fi. However the person you are calling must also have an iPhone.

    Skype – Skype is a program you can download on any smart phone (iPhone or Android), tablet, laptop or desktop. To do this, on an iPhone go to the App store App Store  on an Android go to the Google PlayGoogle Playstore search “Skype” Skype  download the app and create an account. On your account you can search your friends and family who have skype accounts and you can video chat. All you need is Wi-Fi. Skype is available across all devices with access to the internet so once you make an account you can log in on any device.

    Other options – ooVoo ooVooTango TangoViber Viber, and Google Hangouts Google Hangouts are a few other free apps that offer messaging, calling and video chats. Just search for them in your app store, download, create a username and password and then you can connect with others who have accounts! All you need is Wi-Fi. Physical distance does not have to keep you from connecting with your loved ones.

  • Could America Survive a Truck Driver Apocalypse?

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    What would happen if products slowly started to disappear from the store shelves? What if tooth brushes were no longer available, if the pharmacy couldn’t fill your prescription, or if you couldn’t access bottled water due to lack of plastic? Occasionally, we get a glimpse into the importance of our transportation network in times of natural disasters when product deliveries slow to a crawl.

    The term “Moving America” to describe truck drivers is not just catchy, it’s true. Without our hard working truck drivers working all over the country, America would not be able to run as it is accustom to. The Commodity Flow Survey (CFS), a joint effort between the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) and the U.S. Census Bureau, is part of the economic census taken in 5-year intervals and was most recently conducted in 2012. It is the primary source of national and state-level data on domestic freight shipments within major industries in the U.S. The data reported in the CFS is used by policy makers and transportation planners throughout various federal, state, and local agencies.

    Trucks can be seen all over the roads of America so it is easy to draw the conclusion, and the CFS confirms, that trucking is the predominant mode of shipment in the U.S. Its biggest competitor is the railroad system, but when you compare the stats, it’s a distant second to the total goods shipped by the trucking industry.

    truck vs. rail

    Tonnage shipped by mode

    The CFS also showed the tonnage of U.S. shipments by industry in the graph below.Tonnage shipped by industry

    The top 15 commodities shipped within these industries include, mixed freight, gasoline, electrical equipment and components, vehicle parts, pharmaceutical products, machinery, fuel oils, prepared foodstuffs, fats, oils, plastics and rubber, textiles, miscellaneous manufactured products, base metal, precision instruments, chemical products and preparations. Without these products, the U.S. economy and businesses would struggle and shut down. Check out thisinfographic created by truckerclassified.com showing what would happen if trucks stopped.

    September 13-19 is officially driver appreciation week. Across the county different events are taking place to show America’s appreciation of their truck drivers. If companies don’t get their supplies, they won’t be able to make their products and the economy would struggle. Our truck driver truly do move America.

  • Autonomous Trucks - the Way of the Future Where do Drivers Fit in?

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    A term has been floating around for the past year or so that can sound a bit intimidating to some – Autonomous Trucks. Many questions and fears come to mind about the effect this technology will have on transportation jobs and the driver shortage. The fear to put to rest is this idea that “autonomous” means “driver-less.” This is far from the truth. In fact, it is the hope that this technology will help with the driver shortage, not by taking jobs from the drivers, but by making their job more enjoyable, easier and improving their quality of life.

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration defines 4 different levels of automation.

    Level 0 - driver is in complete control of the primary controls of the vehicle.

    Level 1 - involves automation of one or more specific control functions. For example, vehicle automatically assists with braking.

    Level 2 - involves automation of at least two primary control functions designed to work in unison to relieve the driver of certain functions. For example, cruise control and lane centering.

    Level 3 - limited self-driving automation that allows the driver to relinquish control of all safety-critical functions under certain conditions. The driver is always available to take back control when necessary. (This is the kind of truck being demonstrated).

    Level 4 - full self-driving vehicle, requiring no driver control other than someone to input the destination. (Freightliner has said it has no interest in developing a Level 4 truck).

    Level 3 is the level currently being pursued and a Level 4 is a very long ways down the road and may never come to be because of the major regulatory, legal and social roadblocks.Autonomous Trucks

    This automation is something for drivers to be excited about, not worried. Wilfried Achenbach, Senior Vice President of Engineering and Technology for Daimler Trucks North America, explained that the human brain and eye have the ability to process information/input from their surroundings rapidly and then make a quick decision. “Software today is far from being able to handle that,” Achenbach said. Therefore, current autonomous-technology programs focus on less-complex on-highway operations, or pre-programmed routes, with the driver available to take over when necessary.

    Behind the technology

    Such trucks have been introduced by a few manufacturers; from the Mercedes-Benz Future Truck 2025to the Freightliner Inspiration Truck. The pilot systems use a combination of technology such as radar sensors, a stereo camera behind the windshield, three-dimensional maps and V2V/V2I communication (exchange of information between the truck and other vehicles and the roadway).

    Peterbilt also has been researching and presenting autonomous technologies. Bill Kahn, manager of advanced concepts at Peterbilt, refers to the technology as “advanced driver assist systems” rather than autonomous. GPS-based autopilot systems are being researched to allow for preprogrammed courses in urban environments. The concept is “drivers become less of a driver and more of a decision maker” says Kahn.

    What this means for the driver

    The main thing that has been emphasized by the technologies developers is that these are NOT driver-less trucks. These are advances aimed to improve the safety and efficiency of the trucking industry with drivers at the helm directing and making decisions only drivers can make.

    Daimler Trucks North America feels that the autonomous systems reduce driving stress and increase driver health. Research done by Freightliner found that sleepiness is reduced by as much as 25% when in the autonomous mode. When the drivers were questioned about sleepiness they appeared more rested and refreshed.

    This new technology allows the driver to sit back a bit and enjoy the ride instead of having to constantly be vigilance and alert – something that quickly weighs on a person. It opens up the possibility for drivers to get other work done, such as locating backhauls or tackling office applications to improve efficiency.

    Let us know your thoughts about this new technology by commenting on our Facebook page.

  • 2015 Brake Safety Week Make Sure You Are in Compliance

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) announced that brake safety week is set for September 6-12 this year. Brake safety week is part of the Operation Airbrake programsponsored by CVSA and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Law enforcement agencies across North America will conduct brake system inspections during this week to find out-of-adjustment brakes and brake-system violations.

    During the 2014 Roadcheck, brake-related violations represented 46.2% of all out-of-service violations. 13,305 vehicles were inspected in last year’s brake safety week. Of those inspected, 2,162 vehicles were placed out of service for brake violations. 2014 saw an increase across the board in the number of vehicles placed out- of- service for various brake related issues. Since the previous year, vehicles placed out-of-service for brakes overall rose 2.7%, for brake components rose 2.2% and for brake adjustment we saw an increase of 1.4%. The below graph shows the out-of-service rate since 2011.

    Brake Safety Week Statistics

    What to expect during safety week inspections:

    • Inspection of brake-system components to identify loose or missing parts, air or hydraulic fluid leaks, worn linings, pads, drums or rotors, and other faulty brake-system components
    • Inspection of anti-lock braking systems (ABS) malfunction indicator lamps
    • Measurement of pushrod stroke when appropriate
    • Possible Level I inspections, and performance-based brake testing (PBBT) equipment may be used in ten participating jurisdictions to test overall vehicle braking efficiency.

    Read more about the inspection procedurepast results, and educational efforts.

  • A New Technology that will Change the Way you Drive

    by Super Admin | Mar 24, 2016

    As technology advances, the term predictive maintenance has emerged. Predictive maintenance is the proactive analysis and monitoring that can predict and prevent equipment failure before it occurs. This is different from preventative maintenance, which is regular maintenance performed on a piece of equipment to lessen the likelihood of it failing. Predictive maintenance provides sufficient warning for maintenance to be planned and executed purposefully, as opposed to unplanned reactive maintenance due to failure. New technology has emerged that can combine that big data performance history with real-time, on-the-road telematics and diagnostic capability.

    Understanding how drivers operate their trucks is critical to understanding the wear and tear on the vehicle. Driver mechanical behavior includes things such as how the driver is braking, using the clutch, shifting gears, using the engine brake, etc. The technology takes into account ergonomics and simple factors such as pedal position, compressor use, and time given the turbines to spin up and down when turning the engines on and off and then analyzes the effects which then provides actionable solutions. Improvements are already being made. Something as simple as reassessing pedal position saved a bus fleet 30% on fuel and also reduced brake pad replacements by 30%.

    Some feel the predictive maintenance technology is still 24 months out before it would be able to effectively give recommendations to optimize performance and anticipate problems. Others believe that the time for predictive maintenance is now. Traffilog is one of the leaders in this new all-encompassing technology.

    Telematics technology was first developed by the Israeli military and has now been commercialized. The technology is in 41 countries and has gathered around 14 billion miles of vehicle performance data. This technology takes current diagnostics and reporting a step further. For example, it not only tracks the driver safety event that triggers alerts but digs deeper to monitor exactly how the driver is driving the truck and what the surrounding conditions are at the time. It looks into trends for things such as brakes, oil temperature, gearboxes, clutches, turbos, and more.

    The new technology acts as a central hub for everything from in-cab cameras to dispatch software. What makes it stand out among the rest is its ability to analyze the data and predict factors that will cause future problems and address them now.

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